Gluten Sensitivity May be the Reason Why You Can’t Lose the Excess Weight!

gluten

1 out of 3 people, 40% of the population may have gluten sensitivity. A large majority of these people may not not even be aware of it! As a nurse I’ve seen many patients get treated for migraines, arthritis, gastrointestinal issues, skin rashes and the like when the underlying cause was gluten sensitivity. Gluten sensitivity can be a contributor to weight gain because increase appetite and craving for simple carbohydrates and fatty foods may be your body’s defense mechanism to replenish the nutrients that your body is unable to absorb because of this issue.

  1. What is gluten? Gluten (combined with glutenin and gliaden) is a protein found in grain products. Gluten is what makes grains chewy. It’s what makes dough stretchy.  It’s insoluble in water.
  1. Where is Gluten found? Gluten is found in all grains. The gluten in rice and corn is safe for celiac patients or people with NCGS, but the gluten in wheat, barley, and rye is not.  Examples of grains that do not have gluten include wild rice, corn, buckwheat, millet, amaranth, quinoa, teff, oats, soybeans, and sunflower seeds.  Although Oats don’t contain gluten some gluten sensitive people have a similar reaction to the protein in oats. This is extremely rare and majority of the concern with GS people are related to cross contamination of the oats with gluten products via storage and processing of the oats. Getting certified gluten-free oats and oatmeal made with certified gluten-free oats will be okay.
  1. What is gluten intolerance? Can be divided into 3 categories:

a. Celiac disease Celiac disease is usually an inherited auto-immune disorder that affects the individual as does a gluten allergy. In celiac disease, in addition to the gluten allergy symptoms, the body’s response to gluten causes damage to the inner walls of the small intestine. This autoimmune response to gluten where the body produces antibodies that destroy the vili of the small intestines making it difficult to absorb nutrients

b. Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitive, or NCGS. Gluten intolerance is characterized by flu-like symptoms including diarrhea, bloating, fatigue, bloody stools and weight loss. While this condition is uncomfortable, it is not life-threatening.

 

c. Gluten Allergy: Is an auto-immune disorder in which the body produces antibodies to fight what it considers to be an intruder into the system, namely gluten. Symptoms of a gluten allergy include sneezing, a runny nose and wheezing and carries the potential of anaphylactic shock, which is a life-threatening condition.

 

  1. What are the signs and symptoms of it?
  • Abdominal Distention
  • Abdominal Pain and Cramping
  • Alternating Bouts of Diarrhea and Constipation
  • Anemia
  • Arthritis
  • Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)
  • Autism
  • Bloating
  • Bone Density Loss
  • Borborygmi (stomach rumbling)
  • Constipation
  • Stunted Growth and Failure to Thrive
  • Depression, Anxiety and Irritability
  • Dermatitis Herpetiformis
  • Diabetes
  • Diarrhea
  • Fatigue
  • Malodorous Flatulence
  • Malodorous Stools
  • Gluten Ataxia
  • Grayish Stools
  • Hair Loss (Alopecia)
  • Headaches and Migraines
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Infertility
  • Joint pain
  • Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis
  • Lactose intolerance
  • Mouth sores or mouth ulcers
  • Nausea
  • Numbness or tingling in the patient’s hands and feet
  • Osteoporosis
  • Peripheral Neuropathy (including either a tingling or sensation of swelling your toes and fingers)
  • Sjogren’s Disease
  • Steatorrhea (high lipids in the stool, which may cause the stool to float)
  • Teeth and Gum Problems
  • Turner Syndrome
  • Vitamin and Mineral deficiencies
  • Vomiting
  • Unexplained Weight loss
  • Urticaria
  1. How can someone know if they have Gluten-Intolerance or Celiac disease?

A simple anti-gliadin antibody blood test can help indicate if you have a sensitivity to gluten. An intestinal biopsy can then provide a conclusive diagnosis and should be done if the blood test is positive. Conclusive results for gluten intolerance are usually found by putting a patient on an elimination diet to see if eliminating gluten relieves their issues. However, this is not the first step. Blood testing and allergen testing is done first, as elimination diets can be risky if other issues are present. A blood test to determine if the patient has Celiac’s Disease, a severe gluten intolerance, is first done. The primary blood panel for celiac disease involves testing for the level of the antibodies AGA, EMA and most importantly Anti-tTG.

 

Clinical Gluten Intolerance Tests

Gluten Intolerance Test

The following test are often conducted by thorough doctors when evaluating patients for gluten intolerance or celiac disease:

  • Stool Fat test, to determine malabsorption level (test for Steatorrhea).
  • Complete Blood count (CBC), to determine anemia.
  • Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) to look for inflammation.
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP) to further watch for inflammation.
  • Vitamin B12, D, and E to check for vitamin deficiency.
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) to analyze protein, calcium and electrolyte levels as well as to check liver and kidney functions.
  1. What Kinds of Foods Contain Gluten?

Always avoid

In order to avoid eating gluten, avoid food and drinks containing:

  • Barley
  • Bulgur
  • Durham
  • Farina
  • Graham flour
  • Kamut
  • Matzo meal
  • Rye
  • Semolina
  • Spelt (a form of wheat)
  • Triticale
  • Wheat

Avoid unless labeled ‘gluten free’

Avoid these foods unless they’re labeled as gluten free or made with corn, rice, soy or other gluten-free grain. Also check the label to see that they’re processed in a facility that is free of wheat or other contaminating products:

  • Beers
  • Breads
  • Candies
  • Cakes and pies
  • Cereals
  • Cookies
  • Crackers
  • Croutons
  • Gravies
  • Imitation meats or seafood
  • Oats
  • Pastas
  • Processed luncheon meats
  • Salad dressings
  • Sauces (including soy sauce)
  • Self-basting poultry
  • Soups

 Clinical Gluten Intolerance Tests

Gluten Intolerance Test

The following test are often conducted by thorough doctors when evaluating patients for gluten intolerance or celiac disease:

  • Stool Fat test, to determine malabsorption level (test for Steatorrhea).
  • Complete Blood count (CBC), to determine anemia.
  • Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) to look for inflammation.
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP) to further watch for inflammation.
  • Vitamin B12, D, and E to check for vitamin deficiency.
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) to analyze protein, calcium and electrolyte levels as well as to check liver and kidney functions.

 Your R.I.L Assignment

If you believe you may have a gluten sensitivity try going 30 days on a gluten free diet. The Gluten-Free Mall is a great resource

If you are ready to Reign in Health and Fitness, lower your blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar and get rid of those excess pounds find out the 10 keys that I utilized to lose over 80 pounds and keep it off because not yesterday, not tomorrow but right NOW is YOUR time to Reign in Health and Fitness! Click Here to find out more

 

 

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Shelita Williams, R.N. helps aspiring and established women entrepreneurs who struggle with achieving their health and fitness goals, to lose weight, increase energy, boost confidence and establish brand integrity so that they are poised, fit and motivated to start, manage and grow their business! Sign up for your free eCourse and Reign in Health and Fitness updates!

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